Have you recently experienced a life-changing event – marriage, job change, arrival of a child or a new home?. Throughout these life stage events, your finances are affected as your goals and plans changes. Take a moment to think about your financial situation and examine your financial needs.

Have you considered how life events can affect your financial situation and how you can prepare for them? Marriage, becoming a parent or change of job is some of the life events that should prompt a re-evaluation of your financial portfolio. We have the educational information and tools to help you manage these life events and help you stay on track with your financial strategy.

When you are creating your financial plan, it’s important to understand that it’s not a one-time event but an ongoing process. Any time you can experience a life stage event, therefore it’s a good idea to review your financial plan and make changes as needed.

Single : Carefree (Less than 30 years old)

 Typically a carefree person, you don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 We suggest you start investing in a property (50%). Once you begin to have your own family, the daily expenses tend to rise for the first few years as you settle down. That does not leave much scope for investing. Though the returns from property may not be very high, it is good to have the security and comfort of owning your own home early.

 Keep some money (30%) in equity. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can also have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Always good to keep some money (10%) in fixed return instruments. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

You are carefree now, but plan for the future!

Single : Building Wealth (30 -45 Years)

 You are probably building wealth. With no immediate family to support, you may have already acquired your own property (40% of your investment pool) so free up money to invest in other assets.

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a good amount of money (35%) in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Keep a decent amount of money (15%) in fixed return instruments. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

 We wish you all the best in your efforts to build wealth for a happy future!

Single : Adding to Wealth (45-55 Years)

 You have probably accumulated some wealth. With no immediate family to support, you may have already acquired your own property (30% of your investment pool) so free up money to invest in other assets.

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a large amount of money (45%) in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market. The good thing about investing in equities is that, if you made the right selection, you can actually generate good returns to take care of your retirement days. Although you are still young and hopefully in good health, start thinking about the eventuality of retirement and how much money you will need to maintain a decent lifestyle.

 Keep 15% in fixed return instruments. In addition to being a stable part of your portfolio, the interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

 We wish you all the best in your efforts to add to your wealth!

Single : Carefree Retirement (More than 55 Years)

 You have probably accumulated some wealth. Retirement is around the corner if not already upon you. Steadiness and safety are your prime investment objectives at this stage. With no immediate family to support, you may have already acquired your own property (30% of your investment pool) so free up money to invest in other assets.

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep 35% of your money in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market. The good thing about investing in equities is that, if you made the right selection, you can actually generate good returns to take care of your retirement days. Although you are still young and hopefully in good health, start thinking about the eventuality of retirement and how much money you will need to maintain a decent lifestyle.

 Keep 25% in fixed return instruments. In addition to being a stable part of your portfolio, the interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

Enjoy a carefree retirement!

 

Married (No Children) : Property Top Priority (Less than 30 Years)

 You need to plan for the days when you may have a family. Property is your top priority. Keep 50% of your money in property.

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a decent amount of money (30%) in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Keep some money (10%) in debentures and bonds. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

You have just started. But if you plan it well, the journey is fun and the target is achievable!

Married (No Children) : Building Wealth (30 – 45 Years)

 You need to plan for the days when you may have a family. Hopefully, you have already made your investment in a property. Keep no more than 50% of your money in property

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a decent amount of money (30%) in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Keep some money (10%) in debentures and bonds. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

Married (No Children) : Planning for Retirement (45 -55 Years)

 You should have built a nice, cozy nest for yourselves by now. Maybe you could think about an earlier retirement. Spend more time travelling, doing social work, helping out relatives and friends. Hopefully, you have already made your investment in a property. Keep no more than 40% of your money in property.

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a decent amount of money (30%) in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Keep some money (20%) in debentures and bonds. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

You are soon set to enjoy the benefits of your hard work. But don’t lose sight of your financial goals. And your discipline.

Married (No Children) : Carefree Retirement (More than 55 Years)

 You should have built a nice, cozy nest for yourselves by now. Maybe you have already taken an early retirement and are spending more time travelling, doing social work, helping out relatives and friends. Hopefully, you have already made your investment in a property. Keep no more than 35% of your money in property.

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a decent amount of money (30%) in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Keep some money (25%) in debentures and bonds. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

You are probably enjoying the benefits of your hard work. But don’t lose sight of your financial goals. And your discipline.

Married (Two Children) : Property top Priority (Less than 30 Years)

You need to plan for the days ahead -not only for yourselves, but also for your children. As they grow, they will need an education and maybe some starting assets in life. A small property or co-ownership in a separate property may not be a bad idea to give them that extra security. But a property of your own is your top priority at this stage. Keep 50% of your money in property.

You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a decent amount of money (30%) in equity -you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Keep some money (10%) in debentures and bonds. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

You have just started. But if you plan it well, the journey is fun -and the target is achievable! What’s more, you will be the proud parents of two grateful children.

Married (Two Children) : Planning Children’s Future (30 – 45 Years)

 You need to plan for the days ahead – not only for yourselves, but also for your children. As they grow, they will need an education and maybe some starting assets in life. A small property or co-ownership in a separate property may not be a bad idea to give them that extra security. You should be well on your way to having a property of your own at this stage. And maybe you should begin to focus on money for the children’s education. Keep 50% of your money in property.

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a decent amount of money (30%) in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Keep some money (10%) in debentures and bonds. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

You have just started. But if you plan it well, the journey is fun – and the target is achievable! What’s more, you will be the proud parents of two grateful children.

Married (Two Children) : Property for Children (45 – 55 Years)

 You should have built a nice, cozy nest for yourselves by now. Hopefully, you have already made your investment in a property for yourselves and for the children. The education part of their lives is the focus of your attention at this stage. Keep no more than 50% of your money in property.

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a decent amount of money (20%) in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Keep some money (20%) in debentures and bonds. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you. Additionally, the interest from the debentures should help you maintain a decent lifestyle as you contemplate retirement.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

You are soon set to enjoy the benefits of your hard work. But don’t lose sight of your financial goals. And your discipline. Meanwhile, your children are well taken care of with a good education and property in their names. Well done.

Married (Two Children) : Retired / Children on their Own (More than 55 Years)

 You should have built a nice, cozy nest for yourselves by now. Maybe you have already taken an early retirement and are spending more time travelling, doing social work, helping out relatives and friends. And your children if they need your help. Hopefully, you have already made your investment in a property. Keep no more than 50% of your money in property.

 You don’t need to have more than 5% of your money in savings accounts.

 Keep a decent amount of money (20%) in equity – you should not need that money in a hurry so you are unlikely to be a distress seller of shares. Equities as an investment may be good long-term investments but they can have one or two bad years and, if you need the money urgently, you may be selling into a distressed stock market.

 Keep some money (20%) in debentures and bonds. The interest from the money invested in fixed income instruments may be given to your parents or brothers and sisters in case they are financially dependent on you. Additionally, the interest from the debentures should help you maintain a decent lifestyle as you contemplate retirement.

 And keep some (5%) in gold too. Gold is an international asset priced in US Dollars and sometimes acts as a hedge against loss of wealth due to a weak Indian Rupee.

You look behind you at what has been achieved and you can smile. Your planning has done you well. Enjoy the satisfaction of having fulfilled your duties and take some time to enjoy yourselves. Very soon, you may have grandchildren to share your joys with!

But don’t lose sight of your financial goals. And your discipline

As your individual financial goals become mutual, analyze some of the financial planning needs, which you must address to secure your family’s future financially. We can help you address some questions that will help you prepare to start a new family:

  • What are your financial goals and how are they prioritized? How will you work towards these goals?
  • Do you plan to buy a home?
  • Do you want to have a child?
  • Have you worked out a monthly investment plan?
  • Have you analyzed the insurance needs of your working spouse?
  • How much should you be saving for retirement?
  • What is your risk tolerance for investing?
  • Do you and your spouse have the same tolerance for risk or do you differ?

When you get married, your life changes and so does your financial needs. Indian Wealth Management can help you start your finances on the right path with an eye towards your family’s future dreams.

 

Financial planning is essential when having a new addition to your family, considering education expenses, tax implications and the insurance needs of your family. We can help you address some questions, while you prepare to have child :

  • Have you reviewed your health insurance to check the availability of maternity benefits?
  • Have you reviewed your life insurance to cover not only the cost of living for future for your spouse and child but also cover her/his education as well as marriage cost?
  • Have you thought of making adjustments in your day to day budgeting with increasing expenses and possible income changes, if your spouse takes a career break?
  • Have you analyzed various savings choices for short-term expenses and long-term goals including the education and marriage of your child?
  • With a new child’s expenses it can be tempting to cut back on saving for retirement.
  • Have you discussed ways to resolve competing needs to save for retirement and education?

Arhaum Enterprises(Indian Wealth Management) assists your growing family, as your goals and priorities change. Our unique approach to financial planning for new families is built to be flexible, evolving with your life.  We assist you to meet with you regularly to help you stay on track as you plan for your future.

While you cannot exercise control over life and death, you can certainly plan for the financial security of your loved ones in the event of an unforeseen incident. Life insurance is the only financial tool that protects you financially against uncertainties of life in a comprehensive manner.

It provides financial security in the event of death of an earning member of the family and is therefore an important constituent of any sound financial plan. Different types of insurance help protect you and your family in different ways against the cost of accidents, sickness, disability, death and other life-changing events.

Home ownership is a core component in anyone’s lives. That is why it is important to build a budget for financial protection into your new home purchase. Need help with getting started as a home buyer and considering how your expenses will change with home ownership? Arhaum Enterprises(Indian Wealth Management) planner can help you with some of the questions:

  • Have you evaluated what you will need for a down payment?
  • Will your home purchase have an impact on your other financial goals?
  • Do you need to make adjustments to your financial plan?
  • If you’re going to live in the home as your primary residence, do you understand the tax benefits of home ownership?

Once you’ve decided on your new home to purchase, we can assist you with various home-buying details, and help you stay on track to achieve your other financial goals.

If you’re moving to another employer, you will have some big decisions to make. Should you take your old employer’s retirement plan money with you? Which benefit options should you choose? How will your job change impact your financial situation? Arhaum Enterprises(Indian Wealth Management) can help you with some of the questions, while you are changing jobs:

  • Do you understand your new benefits package and options, including health care, life, long-term care, and disability income insurance? Will you need additional insurance?
  • Have you determined how your job change might affect existing employee stock options?
  • How might your income and expense changes impact your future financial goals?

Our comprehensive, step-by-step retirement-focused approach ensures that we help you plan for all your financial dreams.

  • Identifying Your Financial & Retirement Goals: Identify various life stage responsibilities and goals to estimate the corpus required towards achieving these goals. This includes planning for various life-stage goals such as child’s education, marriage and post-retirement income along with other short-term goals like contingencies or vacations. The next step is to estimate the corpus that would be required at various points in time to meet these goals. This helps you understand your financial needs in the future and prepares you for taking the necessary steps.
  • Planning: Planning entails a complete financial health check. The basic objective is to estimate your cash flow and the risk to its continuity. It involves a complete assessment of your income, expenses, assets and liabilities. Planning helps understand whether you are living above your means or whether your liabilities would eat into your savings. It helps you to understand how your money flows!
  • Investor Profiling: Assess your risk profile to understand your risk tolerance and appetite. While risk appetite refers to your capacity to take risk, risk tolerance indicates how much risk your finances can handle. Your investment decisions depend on your risk profiling to a great extent.
  • Asset Allocation: Recommend an asset allocation to diversify and adapt your portfolio to your needs and investment climate. Asset allocation is the process of combining various asset classes such as large and small/mid-cap equities, bonds, cash equivalents, gold etc. Typically, each investment category reacts differently to changing economic and market conditions creating a mix of asset classes that can help balance risk and return.
  • Investment Allocation Strategy: Advise investment options to deploy savings in chosen alternatives. Asset allocation determines the overall asset classes for investment. The next critical step is to choose from a wide variety of investment options available amongst each asset class and make investments as per the plan.
  • Periodic Monitoring and Rebalancing: Review your plan for your risk tolerance, cash flow volatility and market conditions and re-balance as necessary. It is important to monitor and review your plan every 3-6 months and re-balance your portfolio after taking into account the above factors.

  • Start Now: The most important point in financial planning is that one must start early.
  • Know Your Asset: Recognize your most important financial asset and plan accordingly
  • Make sure your lifestyle costs lag your income growth
  • Get specific with your goals. There’s an old expression: “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will lead you there.” When it comes to your money, you need to have specific goals.
  • Focus on needs, not wants.
  • Keep it simple. Often we get too complex in our planning.
  • Know your weak points. Understand your investments, and plan a strategy by constantly monitoring and making changes in your portfolio.
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